A Crannog

The Irish National Heritage Park Story

From the way we talk, to the music we listen to, to the names we call ourselves and the placenames that surround us, our lives have been shaped by our ancestors. But who were they? How did they live? Join us on an exciting 9,000-year journey and see Irish history brought to life, over 40 acres of native woodland, marsh and shoreline.

Heritage Park - tower image

The Beginning

The Irish National Heritage Park opened in the Summer of 1987 and has developed into a 40-acre outdoor museum, showcasing 16 reconstructed sites, each built using the materials and skills of the period. Situated in 40 acres of reclaimed marshland on the banks of the River Slaney. The main theme of the park is archaeological heritage and the promotion of tourism in the region, while supporting local employment and trades people. The name Ferrycarrig originates from the fact that there was a ferry crossing where the bridge now stands for over a thousand years and the town of Carrig which stood above it.

Illustration of a new stone age farmstead
Aerial shot of Crannog

The Site

The site at Ferrycarrig, just outside Wexford Town, is an ideal location for an outdoor museum. To begin with, it includes the remains of the very first fortification built by the Anglo-Normans in Ireland. It also comprises a variety of landscapes, from hillside, to estuary, to woodland, to river bank. As you journey through the park, the features and installations are all in authentic settings, from the Dolmen, to the Fulacht Fiadh, to the Crannóg, to the Viking ship.
It was one of the first experiential museums of its kind when it opened in 1987 and continues to offer an unrivalled range of activities, reconstructions, workshops and courses for visitors of all ages.

Illustration of Corndrying Kiln

Book Tickets

Booking your tickets online before you arrive is convenient and it secures your place.

Clost up portrait of an owl

What’s On

It’s always worth checking the calendar to see what’s coming up at The Irish National Heritage Park. Better still, why not join our mailing list and receive regular updates? There’s always something going on – you could say we’re making history every day!

Illustration of a piece of flint / rock